Print Lovers at 30: Celebrating Three Decades of Giving

Social Justice, Humor and Parody

Since the early 16th century, printmakers have created imagery intended to provoke thought and even defy the social order. Politically and socially conscious artists continue to challenge us with startling images that expose stereotypes and disrupt the status quo. Through parody, irony and humor, they raise provocative questions about race, gender and other urgent social and political issues.

Lesley Dill, b. 1950
Arms, 1994
F95-6/3

Lesley Dill, b. 1950
Back, 1994
F95-6/2

Warrington Colescott, b. 1921
Tomato Morning, 1991
F91-3

Red Grooms, b. 1937
Matisse in Nice, 1992
F93-1

Roger Yukata Shimomura, b. 1939
Kabuki Party, 1988
F88-13

Jaune Quick-to-see Smith, b. 1940
Tribe/Community, 1996
F96-20/2

Tom Huck, b. 1971
Gag Bags and Taco Girls, 2001
2001.25

Ron Adams, b. 1934
Blackburn, 2002
2003.2

Enrique Chagoya, b. 1953
Pretty Teacher! (Linda maestra!), 1999
2005.2.1

Enrique Chagoya, b. 1953
Which of Them is the More Overcome? (Quien mas rendido?), 1999
2005.2.4

Enrique Chagoya, b. 1953
The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters (El sueño de la razón produce monstruos), 1999
2005.2.6

Enrique Chagoya, b. 1953
They Spruce Themselves Up (Se repulen), 1999
2005.2.7

Radcliffe Bailey, b. 1968
UNIA (Universal Negro Improvement Association), 2003
2006.2

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