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The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky

  • Arthur Amiotte
    Arthur Amiotte's artistic work is an expression of the love of Lakota tradition and is founded in the philosophy, rituals and oral history of his people.
  • Kevin Pourier
    Kevin Pourier, a Lakota artist, creates jewelry and also enjoys making whimsical forms such as eyeglasses he calls "Rez Bans." His primary medium is buffalo horn.
  • Jamie Okuma
    Jamie Okuma grew up creating her own beaded dance regalia. Today, historical accuracy, exemplary workmanship and keen attention to detail are the hallmarks of her work.
  • Joyce Growing Thunder Fogarty
    Joyce Growing Thunder Fogarty is known for her superb craftsmanship and innovative design of traditional forms. Her daughter, Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty creates traditional Plains clothing and accessories adorned with beadwork and porcupine quill embroidery.
  • Monty Claw
    Monty Claw creates fans that merge his Navajo heritage with the traditions of Plains feather work.
  • Rhonda Holy Bear
    Rhonda Holy Bear is one of the nation's premier doll makers. Her Lakota dolls are based on traditional forms, but she has extended this in terms of their scale and remarkable intricacy.
  • JoAllyn Archambault
    JoAllyn Archambault, the Director of the American Indian Program at the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C., talks about tribal traditions and the many changes in the Native American culture.
  • Bently Spang
    Bently Spang's work confronts contemporary and historical issues of cultural identity and place, and his relationship with his reservation homeland is often a central element of his work. Spang's ongoing "Modern Warrior" series of "war shirts" began in 1998. Spang's shirts are autobiographical, referencing the artist's relationship with his family, Northern Cheyenne community and home in Montana.
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