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365 Days of Art Archive - Kansas City Sculpture Park collection

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From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
01.31.09

Jacques Lipchitz Peace on Earth

Peace on Earth symbolically represents the upward transition from earth to heaven: the Lamb of God, angels, the Virgin Mary and ultimately the Holy Spirit, in the traditional form of a dove.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
03.29.09

Henry Spencer Moore Upright Motive No. 9

Henry Spencer Moore acknowledged that this form was inspired by the verticality of trees and Northwest Coast American Indian totem poles.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
04.29.09

Henry Spencer Moore Three-Part Object

Henry Spencer Moore observed that “Three-Part Object has a connection with insect life, possibly centipedes” and that “each segment has a leg.”



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
05.28.09

Henry Spencer Moore Large Totem Head

Moore’s interest in the art of ancient and non-European cultures can be seen in Large Totem Head, which shares with Egyptian and African art its simplicity of form and symmetry.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
06.27.09

Judith Shea Storage

Judith Shea used to be a fashion designer. Storage includes a hollow coat and dress that lean propped up against the wall as if stored.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
12.26.08

Tony Cragg Ferryman

Ferryman’s shapeless form extrudes and wraps in upon itself in an endless flow of energy to create a playful dialog between interior and exterior spaces.



From the KCSP collection.
10.25.09

Henry Spencer Moore Reclining Figure: Hand

The sensuous curves of Reclining Figure: Hand echo those of the landscape. For Moore, whose sculptures were inspired by his collection of rocks, bones, shells and weathered wood, everything was part of Nature.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
02.25.09

Abakanowicz Standing Figures

The artist says that these figures evoke memories of childhood and stories of the mythical beings who haunted the forests of her homeland Poland.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
04.22.09

Henry Spencer Moore Two-Piece Reclining Figure

Henry Spencer Moore combined two separate components in Two-Piece Reclining Figure No. 9, because, as he said, “If it is in two pieces, there’s a bigger surprise, you have more unexpected views.”



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
05.21.09

Alexander Calder Tom's Cubicle

The “Tom” of Tom’s Cubicle refers to Tom Messer, director of New York’s Guggenheim Museum at the time when the sculpture was first exhibited there in 1967.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
03.21.09

Henry Spencer Moore Large Interior Form

Henry Spencer Moore said that a hole was like a “revelation” because it “connects one side to the other,” making a sculpture “immediately more three-dimensional.”



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
01.20.09

Ursula von Rydingsvard Three Bowls

The more than 9-feet-tall bowls inThree Bowls are actually hollow, like real bowls.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
06.19.09

Joel Shapiro Untitled

The simple, geometric forms of Joel Shapiro’s sculpture suggest the human body in motion. This figure could be taking a bow or turning a cartwheel.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
02.17.09

Claes Oldenburg Shuttlecocks

Each of the four Shuttlecock weighs 5,550 pounds and stands over 17 feet tall. The feathers weigh 450 pounds a piece.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
04.14.09

Henry Spencer Moore Reclining Connected Forms

The abstract configuration of Reclining Connected Forms suggests a maternal figure containing a childlike shape within her protective embrace.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
05.13.09

Mark Di Suvero Rumi

This sculpture is named for Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi, the great Persian Sufi poet and spiritual leader.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
03.12.09

Henry Spencer Moore Reclining Figure: Hand

No matter how hard you look there is no hand to be seen in this sculpture.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
01.11.09

Gaston Lachaise Bas-Relief Woman

Bas-Relief Woman is Gaston Lachaise’s elegant homage to his wife Isabel, whom he presents as a voluptuous earth mother overflowing with cosmic energy.



From the KCSP collection.
10.10.09

Judith Shea Storage

Judith Shea is a former fashion designer. Here, the hollow, bronze coat, dress forms, and form-fitting garments lean against the wall, like forgotten objects stored in an attic.



From the Kansas City Sculpture Park collection.
02.09.09

Jacques Lipchitz Return of the Prodigal Son

Return of the Prodigal Son was Lipchitz’s first interpretation of a biblical subject.

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